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Author Topic: New to 3d modelling  (Read 3789 times)

FarlanderMiG

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New to 3d modelling
« on: September 20, 2015, 05:48:02 pm »

Hi, im new to 3d modelling, and so far i've only messed around with a couple of planes in blender.

I still dont know much, but at least i have gotten used to the keybindings and stuff in blender.

And then there's 3dsmax... I just got the trail to test it out and oh boy, things are different! I can see how it could possibly be better than blender in the long run though.

So yea, do you guys that have a bit more experience than me have any tips? Should i switch to 3dsmax? Do you know some good tutorials etc.
Mostly interested in aircraft modelling.

Thanks in advance, -Terje

(sorry, this might be the wrong place for this thread. Feel free to move it if it is)
« Last Edit: September 20, 2015, 05:52:54 pm by FarlanderMiG »
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KW71

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Re: New to 3d modelling
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2015, 08:17:02 pm »

The general opinion I have found over the years, is that if you want to work for the industry, you should learn Max, which is the standar for many studios, and if you want to be an indie, you should go for Blender.

Is Max top notch? I'm tempted to say yes, but Blender have become in a really robust application, and if you add the necessary addons from the tons of those free over internet...

I use Max just for personal stuff, because I can't afford a license; I use Blender for work. Personally, when I switch from one to other, I miss features of both, but in the end is as being like a chef... If you know how to cook, is matter of find the instruments in the new kitchen.
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PytonPago

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Re: New to 3d modelling
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2015, 01:19:44 am »

The general opinion I have found over the years, is that if you want to work for the industry, you should learn Max, which is the standar for many studios, and if you want to be an indie, you should go for Blender.

Is Max top notch? I'm tempted to say yes, but Blender have become in a really robust application, and if you add the necessary addons from the tons of those free over internet...

I use Max just for personal stuff, because I can't afford a license; I use Blender for work. Personally, when I switch from one to other, I miss features of both, but in the end is as being like a chef... If you know how to cook, is matter of find the instruments in the new kitchen.

 ... i agree, more or less here. Also, any special plug-ins or add-ons are far better for Max ( for architecture, realistic lighting and material imaging, etc. ). So, even if ya choose to do stuff in Blender in the end for smaller projects, getting deeper into Max is definitely a good idea as it can give you a lot. Especially if ya wanted to go more professional in the modeling field.
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necro

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Re: New to 3d modelling
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2015, 02:02:23 am »

Hy,
i'm using blender since almost 10 years now. But i started with max in the first place which was not very successful. Creating assets for outerra is possible in both programs though. All you need is a collada or fbx exporter.

Max and blender are very popular, so finding beginner tutorials wont be this hard. I can recommend cgcookie which has a section for blender and max. You shouldnt start with complex objects like planes. In case of failure you could lose your motivation which is #1 killer of all projects.
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FarlanderMiG

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Re: New to 3d modelling
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2015, 02:13:36 am »

Thanks, will check his videoes. And yea, i've not tried to do something that complex as it is easy to take on too big projects and burn out in a week.
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PytonPago

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Re: New to 3d modelling
« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2015, 11:52:58 am »

Just choose something ya really like to do, otherwise you get a bad week ...
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John514

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Re: New to 3d modelling
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2015, 05:13:50 am »

Blender noob here as well. Any help with UV Unwrapping would be great.
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PytonPago

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Re: New to 3d modelling
« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2015, 06:09:07 am »

Blender noob here as well. Any help with UV Unwrapping would be great.

 ... something in particular ? .... thing is, you need to think a little of the design and how ya will "cut the pieces". As for me, i  allways did it piece by piece by hand - each box/structure in the mesh having theyr edges for splitting selected (under Shading/UV option during Edit mode - "Mark seam" and when all is marked, Unwrap) ... then i exported the UV. Hidden the "unwrapped parts in the mesh and the next ones were exported too, but in Gimp (or photoshop) joinde in the first one and re-loaded on the UV/Image editor window.  .... you can do automatic unwrapps, but more complicated mesh-forms will be split sometimes in hundreds of pieces (depends on the split-angles defined during auto-unwrapping).
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We are still undeveloped as long as we don´t realize, that all our science is still descriptive, and than beyond that description lies a whole new world we just haven´t even started to fully understand.

John514

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Re: New to 3d modelling
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2015, 06:14:48 am »

I guess I should start with something simple. thanks for the first tips!
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M7

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Re: New to 3d modelling
« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2015, 10:34:07 am »

It sound pretty obvious but Google and Youtube are fantastic tools to learn 3d software without ever reading manuals. Any time you're stuck with something, you can just google the problem and most likely, you'll find a video about it, especially with max and blender.
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PytonPago

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Re: New to 3d modelling
« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2015, 11:02:40 am »

Kinda where my skills popped up too. :D
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We are still undeveloped as long as we don´t realize, that all our science is still descriptive, and than beyond that description lies a whole new world we just haven´t even started to fully understand.