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Outerra Tech Demo download. Help with graphics driver issues

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Author Topic: Wildlife in Outerra:The Game  (Read 15302 times)

Timmo

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Re: Wildlife in Outerra:The Game
« Reply #15 on: December 17, 2012, 02:52:39 pm »

Hmm what about this:
There are hunting games (from the pespective of a Human hunting another animal)- What about a hunting game where the roles are reversed. You are an animal (Bear, Cougar etc) and you have to hunt fat little kids in Yosemite National park or something haha.
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Allan Davidson

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Re: Wildlife in Outerra:The Game
« Reply #16 on: January 06, 2013, 05:54:03 am »

You are an animal (Bear, Cougar etc) and you have to hunt fat little kids in Yosemite National park or something haha.

Oh internet, you silly internet.
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GHAO

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Re: Wildlife in Outerra:The Game
« Reply #17 on: February 15, 2013, 04:37:44 am »

When you think about it, most animals are just repaints of other ones. Wolves, coyotes, hyenas, are basically dogs; zebras and donkeys are basically horses, pandas and polar bears are basically common-or-garden grizzlies. You'd only need to model, say, ten animals, and with a bit of photoshop to create the textures, you'd have a surprising number of animals.
With fish, model the movement, then add in a random size/dimension and colours, and who cares if the clownfish looks suspiciously like a goldfish?
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wesleyibruce

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Re: Wildlife in Outerra:The Game
« Reply #18 on: June 20, 2022, 12:30:14 am »

It would be hard to justify if it wasn't :)

Terrain and climate parameters are available and can be used for such things. Species region could be computed based on some given ranges of individual world parameters. In theory it could even go as far as being able to express a "habitat comfort" as a field value, and compute a gradient vector along which it increases. Animals would be then drawn towards it naturally, leading to effects like seasonal migration ...

oh, the potential
oh, the work
:)

Oh, the work indeed.
I know I'm commenting on an ancient topic. They all are.
Several ways to reduce the work load is to have large animals visible from afar with only two or three lod and none close. Herds seen from miles off. Loaded from otherwise zipped files. When you get close they are gone.
Then you get close fauna by adding snares, feeders to the game which spawn one or two trapped or relatively tame animals. Deer feeders, water troughs, mangers, bird feeders, bait for predator's. Burley for fish. Blow holes for seals in sea ice.
The water trough gets you cattle etc, kangaroos. Mangers gets you sheep & goats. There is something called trap farming. Where water and feed points are fenced with one way gates. Animals push in but can't leave. This makes wild, semi-wild fauna a much smaller load on the server. Farm simulator 2020 has animal farms with static animals. 
The third way is to have a tracking action or binoculars/ sensor. This spawn the animal at a distance. You then hunt it. If it gets too far away it despawns. Thus the world seems full of wild animals but the server load is low. Also If the 'game' can detect the server load and ping it may be able to drop in more plants and animals deleting them later if the load goes up.     
« Last Edit: July 05, 2022, 09:38:33 pm by wesleyibruce »
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